First, a poem I would like to share with you:

RAIN, REIN, REIGN
                    
Clouded is the mind when
Adversity falls like rain
Nevertheless stay in fellowship
Let the Spirit have the reins
So that upon the throne of your heart
Your love for Christ may reign supreme

Larry Chambers

One of the great kings in history was given the opportunity to ask God’s blessing on his reign.  Solomon, in his succession of David to the throne of Israel, recognized the necessity to rule God’s chosen people in righteousness and justice.  Scripture acknowledges that this young king whose faith had been placed in the pre-incarnate Christ, the God of Israel, surprisingly shunned requesting a prosperous and lengthy reign, thus acknowledging his dependence on the Lord.  “Now, O LORD my God, you have made your servant king in place of my father David. But I am only a little child and do not know how to carry out my duties. Your servant is here among the people you have chosen, a great people, too numerous to count or number.  So give your servant a discerning heart to govern your people and to distinguish between right and wrong. For who is able to govern this great people of yours” (1 Kings 3:7-9). This young king had heeded the last admonitions of his father David who had inculcated in him the principle that … “He who rules over men must be just, ruling in the fear of God.  And he shall be like the light of the morning when the sun rises, a morning without clouds, like the tender grass springing out of the earth, by clear shining after rain” (2 Sam 23:3-4). Scripture does not reveal at what age this young king had placed his faith in the coming Messiah who would go to the Cross and pay not only his sin debt but that of the whole world.  But it does record his faith in the LORD his God.  Centuries later, another young lad named Jesus, God in the flesh, astonished the religious leaders with his knowledge of the Scriptures. His inquiry and response to them gave evidence that “Jesus grew in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and men” (Luke 2:52).  Paul, the primary communicator of the doctrines unique to the Church Age, would teach that all wisdom is found in the Savior.  These mysteries of Christ, not previously revealed in Scripture, would mark the dispensation of the Church and usher in a new spiritual life for those who form the body of Christ.  Concerning the believers in Ephesus and the surrounding area, he prayed …“I keep asking that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the glorious Father, may give you the Spirit of wisdom and revelation, so that you may know him better. I pray also that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints,  and his incomparably great power for us who believe” (Eph 1:17-19).  And then in a companion epistle to Colossae, he revealed … “I want you to know how much I am struggling for you and for those at Laodicea, and for all who have not met me personally.  My purpose is that they may be encouraged in heart and united in love, so that they may have the full riches of complete understanding, in order that they may know the mystery of God, namely, Christ,  in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Col 2:1-3).  Paul speaks of these previously unknown assets now available and revealed to us in the epistles when writing to the Corinthians … “No eye has seen, no ear has heard, no mind has conceived what God has prepared for those who love him" (1 Cor 2:9) — “but God has revealed it to us by his Spirit” (1 Cor 2:10).

 

 

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