As one reads the Old Testament Scriptures, it is evident that the prophets spoke of Messiah coming into the world from the perspective of a single advent in which two missions would be accomplished, that of redeeming mankind from the penalty of sin, thus reconciling man to God, and then establishing a kingdom in which there would be universal peace and prosperity.  A clear example of this two-fold message is seen in Isaiah’s proclamation … For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of his government and peace there will be no end. He will reign on David's throne and over his kingdom, establishing and upholding it with justice and righteousness from that time on and forever” (Isa 9:6-7). This same prophet in speaking of Messiah wrote… “The Spirit of the Sovereign LORD is on me, because the LORD has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim freedom for the captives and release from darkness for the prisoners, to proclaim the year of the LORD's favor and the day of vengeance of our God, to comfort all who mourn, and provide for those who grieve in Zion — to bestow on them a crown of beauty instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, and a garment of praise instead of a spirit of despair” (Isa 61:1-3). During Jesus’ earthly ministry, He quoted Isaiah’s prophecy in the Temple when reading from the scroll.  However, He stopped in the middle of the prophecy, thus delineating His advent into two phases because He knew that the nation had rejected Him as Messiah- Savior. "The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to release the oppressed, to proclaim the year of the Lord's favor" (Luke 4:18-19). The message of God’s prophet to Israel was accurate, but its unfolding depended on the nation receiving Messiah as the suffering Servant who would go first to the Cross and provide salvation for the entire human race and then establish His kingdom on earth.  John said … “He was in the world, and though the world was made through him, the world did not recognize him.  He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him” (John 1:10-11).  A yet future time would come in fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy but it would be noticeably different from the coming of a child in a manger.  It would be … “the day of vengeance of our God, to comfort all who mourn, and provide for those who grieve in Zion — to bestow on them a crown of beauty instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, and a garment of praise instead of a spirit of despair” (Isa 61:2-3).  It was John the Apostle who vividly described this second phase or advent … “I saw heaven standing open and there before me was a white horse, whose rider is called Faithful and True. With justice he judges and makes war. His eyes are like blazing fire, and on his head are many crowns. He has a name written on him that no one knows but he himself. He is dressed in a robe dipped in blood, and his name is the Word of God. The armies of heaven were following him, riding on white horses and dressed in fine linen, white and clean. Out of his mouth comes a sharp sword with which to strike down the nations. "He will rule them with an iron scepter." He treads the winepress of the fury of the wrath of God Almighty. On his robe and on his thigh he has this name written: KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS.  That indeed will be a day of horror for the unbelieving world, but no child of God will experience this judgment, for the Apostle wrote …“yet to all who received him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God — children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband's will, but born of God” (John 1:12-13). 

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